OWNERS INFORMATION

Community Management Professionals Specializes In Renting And Managing: Single-Family Homes, Duplexes, Condominiums, And All Types Of Commercial Property

2766 Atlanta Hwy
Gainesville, GA 30504
Phone: 770-535-5520
Fax: 770-406-2797
info@communityprofessional.com
http://communitypm.propertyware.com

 

ABOUT US

 


Community Management Professionals is a specialized real estate firm offering superior client services in home and commercial rentals, full property management services, and investor relationships . Our services are primarily to the Owner/Investor and we do represent Tenants in certain situations.  We are members of GAMLS and FMLS listing services and the National Association of Property Managers (NARPM). Our primary service area covers fourteen counties in Northeast Georgia (Banks, Barrow, Clarke, Dawson, Forsyth, Gwinnett, Habersham, Hall, Jackson, Lumpkin, Oconee, Olgelthorpe, and White counties) but we can assist you with the entire state of Georgia through our association with sister agencies.  We have two offices, the main one is located in Gainesville and the other is located in Athens.

 

PROPERTY RENTAL AND MANAGEMENT SERVICES


Community Management Professionals is the largest single-family residential property rental and management brokerage company in our service area. Our management services currently cover over 470 properties scattered over this fast growing area. We are a full service brokerage company providing our clients and investors with reliable and cost effective property rentals and management by utilizing high-tech solutions to maximize income, maintain low expenses, and to coordinate marketing efforts to achieve low vacancy rates.

We offer several marketing structures for our clients and our fees and services vary depending upon how involved you want us to get. These structures run from just finding you a tenant to fully managing the property and taking care of it from A to Z. One of our qualified agents will be most willing to sit down with you to go over the options and to explain how our programs work.

Depending Upon How Involved You Want Us To Be, Our Services Can Include:

  • Listing and the showing of your property (placing a sign on the property and listing it in our website, Craigslist, over 20 additional rental listing sites, and the MLS systems (when applicable)
  • An "800" interactive phone messaging system so potential tenants setting in front of your house can get information on your property now, and can set up an appointment without having to wait for hours on end (and, by the way, they will not wait)
  • Interactive Google Mapping for your property - www.communitypm.propertyware.com
  • Tenants credit/background verification process to aid in the qualification of potential prospects.
  • Execution of all documents relating to the rental of your property
  • Timely & Easy billings with secure recurring tenant billing (e-check, debit or credit card)
  • Assistance in evaluating cost/benefit relationship for property improvements, including maintenance and repairs costs.
  • Assurance of tenant compliance with lease provisions
  • Negotiation of lease renewals and rent increases.
  • 24-hour Hotline for maintenance calls (we dispatch all calls for you)..
  • Repair diagnosis, proposals, and maintenance scheduling.
  • Quality care with repairs, painting and cleaning
  • Review of all service calls and billings.
  • Regular inspections of all properties.
  • Civil Suits and Evictions professionally handled, protecting the owner's rights, their investment in their property, and their ROI.

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 


 WHAT IS FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT?

 

Full service property management includes monthly collection of rents, administration of eviction notices and lease enforcement, lease renewals, periodic inspections, and monthly operating statements. Full service also includes handling maintenance requests and emergencies with care, contacting the owner when necessary, as well as negotiating prices with qualified vendors.

 WHAT IS YOUR PHILOSOPHY OF MANAGEMENT?

 

Community Management Professionals acts as the intermediary between the owner and tenants, keeping the owner insulated from the daily issues encountered in the renting of your property. In addition to keeping the owner well informed on the status of the property, Community Management Professionals assists in maximizing your income and minimizing expenses while keeping the property well maintained with a low vacancy rate.

 WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE TO PREPARE A PROPERTY FOR RENT?

 

Renting a property is very much the same as selling one. First impressions make the deal 90% of the time. Your property should be in the best possible condition it can be to attract a good quality tenant. Paint should be in good shape with marred or dirty areas touched up. Neutral colors for walls (not white) and flooring are best. Blinds or shades are ideal window coverings. The home should be "detailed" clean and the yard in excellent shape. Remember, tenants cannot be expected to put down pine straw when you did not. Most tenants will respect a property that is respected by the owner so do your best to make that good first impression.  

 HOW DO I DETERMINE THE RENTAL AMOUNT?

 

The competition determines the rental amount. As experts in the field, Community Management Professionals knows the market and the competitive rental ranges for your home or apartment building. If the unit is marketed too high the unit will be vacant much longer. If it is marketed too low, it may be one or two years before your rental price becomes competitive again. There is no easy mix when it comes to determining a rental rate but you can rely on Community Management Professionals to get the best possible rate under the circumstances.  

 HOW DO YOU MARKET THE PROPERTY?

 

Once the listing paperwork is finalized, the Property is immediately added to our rental availability list, various property listing web sites (Craigslist, Truiila, etc.), both multiple listing services (not available for YouShow package), and other resources available to us. Each property is monitored by the property management team to track the marketing effectiveness for the individual property.  

 HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE TO RENT?

 

Vacancy periods are market driven. Location, season and price all affect the vacancy rate  

 WHAT ABOUT SMOKERS?

 

It is common to restrict smoking inside the property. We generally restrict smoking unless the owner agrees. This does not significantly reduce the marketability of the property.  

WHAT ARE THE POLICIES REGARDING PETS?

 

Statistics indicate that 75% of renters own pets. Restricting pets reduces the number of available qualified tenants. Pets will be screened and pet references checked out (Community Management Professionals restricts certain pets, i.e. Chows, Dobermans, Rottweiler's, and Pit Bulls). In general, a well-behaved cat or dog causes little wear and tear on a home and yard. A non-refundable pet deposit is always required for cleaning/ miscellaneous costs. This non-refundable deposit is generally $300 per animal.  

 IS IT POSSIBLE TO REFUSE TO RENT TO FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN?

 

Community Management Professionals adheres to all policies and laws relating to "discrimination". In federal, state, and local Fair Housing regulations children come under the protective class of "familial status" and it is unlawful to discriminate against children in any way.  

 WHAT IS COLLECTED FROM THE TENANT UP FRONT?

 

First month's rent, a security deposit equal to one month's rent and any miscellaneous deposits (i.e. pets), determined on a case per case basis. Community Management Professionals holds all deposits and there is no exception to this rule.  

 WHAT HAPPENS IF THE RENT IS LATE?

 

The rent is due on the first of every month (unless negotiated with the tenant in advance). If the rent is not paid by the 5th, Community Management Professionals takes the first step in the eviction process and sends out a 5-day notice to pay rent or vacate. A hefty late-penalty is then levied against tenant. If the tenant does not pay by the 10th of the month, the owner is notified and Community Management Professionals begins collection proceedings and eviction papers are filed at the magistrate court in the county (unless there are extenuating circumstances that are discussed with the owner). Most evictions are the result of loss of employment or a breakup of a marriage.  

 HOW AND WHEN ARE MONTHLY RENTS DISBURSED TO THE OWNER?

 

Owner statements and rent check deposits occur generally on or before the 10th of each month. The Property Manager acts as an intermediary and monies due you will be deposited via EFTs (electronic funds transfer) unless otherwise agreed upon.  

 WHO HANDLES EMERGENCIES?

 

Community Management Professionals is always on call for emergencies. We have an extensive network of maintenance personnel and sub-contractors to handle any emergency on your property, day or night. We are on call 24 hours a day 365 days a year. Emergency calls are quite delicate, one person's emergency may not be the same for another. We take our job seriously and will dispatch repairs after hours only when we feel necessary.  

 HOW ARE REPAIRS HANDLED?

 

Community Management Professionals is responsible for approving all maintenance requests. Tenants are encouraged to submit all repair requests in writing. It is Community Management Professionals' policy to notify owners of all maintenance requests over $300. Sometimes a request falls into the category of a maintenance emergency. Emergencies are scheduled immediately and the owner is notified at the first possible opportunity.  

 WHAT IS THE AVERAGE LENGTH OF TENANCY?

 

Most rental agreements are set for a one year term. At the end of the lease term the owner can decide to renew to the tenant (if the tenant wishes to remain), vacate the tenant, or allow the tenant to remain on a month-to-month term.

WHAT HAPPENS IF THE TENANT LEAVES BEFORE THE END OF THE LEASE?

 

The tenant is responsible for the rent for the term of the lease. If tenants leave before the termination date listed in their contact they will forfeit their security deposit and Community Management Professionals will notify the credit bureaus of their actions and may pursue legal action against them.  

 HOW IS THE OWNER PROTECTED IF THE TENANT DAMAGES THE PROPERTY?

 

A refundable security deposit taken at move-in is usually sufficient to handle the minor damage caused by tenants. Tenants with good credit and references seldom cause significant damage. Most of the issues we have involve leaving the property in a clean and presentable condition, nothing that cannot be taken care of quickly and inexpensively. These items will be deducted from the tenant's Security Deposit. If the tenant leaves the property owing money for rent and/or damages they will be billed. If they do not pay, Community Management Professionals will file a writ for restitution with the county magistrate court. If the court agrees with the charges the court will enter a judgment against the tenant. The judgment can either be turned over to an attorney or a collection agency. A judgment remains on the person's records against real property generally for a period of five years or until satisfied. WE HIGHLY ENCOURANGE YOU TO OBTAIN ALL RISK LANDLORD INSURANCE.  

CAN YOU ASSIST IN SELLING MY PROPERTY, OR MAYBE BUYING ONE?

 

As was mentioned above Community Management Professionals is a full service realty company, offering services in selling or buying a home, renting out your home or commercial property, and then in managing your investment property.  Community Management Professionals has a full staff of real estate agents who can assist you no matter what your real estate need might be.   

 HOW DO I GET STARTED?

If you are not currently under contract with another property management or real estate company, we can begin right away. If you are currently under contract, you will need to terminate their services according to your agreement with them. We are happy to pick up keys, security deposits and necessary documents from the discontinued company. Once you have completed all necessary forms and returned those to us, we will get started.

 

OWNER DOCUMENTS REQUIRED

 


A copy of your Management Agreement with various intake documents is provided to you along with this package. Please refer to these documents as needed and keep it with this information for a handy reference. It is important that Community Management Professionals receive all critical information before we can begin our program for you. We will not begin marketing until such time as all of the listed documents are in hand.

Management Agreement:  Under Georgia Law, we cannot manage your property unless authorized by you to do so in a Management Agreement.

Owner Information Sheet:  This information enables Community Management Professionals to set up your account.

Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) Authorization Form:  This lets us set you up for transferring your rents monies.

W-9:  This form enables Community Management Professionals to send you a Form 1099 for preparation of your end of the year taxes.

Insurance Authorization:  This form request that your homeowner's insurance company issue a copy of your property insurance to Community Management Professionals and they name Community Management Professionals as additional insured on your policy. Please send this directly to the insurance company and forward a copy of your request to Community Management Professionals.

Owner's Property Disclosure Statement:  This Georgia Association of Realtor's form provides detailed property information for our records.

Change of Owner Information Form:  Notify Community Management Professionals of any important change when it happens; address, telephone, fax, e-mail, etc.

Owner Work Order Authorization:  For larger projects, this form authorizes us to perform specific work on the property.

Owner Vacation Notice Form:  This is for notifying Community Management Professionals when you will be unavailable for more than two weeks so that Community Management Professionals is prepared in the event of an emergency

 

OWNER RESPONSIBILITIES

 


  • Maintain their property in a condition that is marketable and habitable.
  • Notify Community Management Professionals of any ownership change or imminent owner change for the managed property.
  • Supply Community Management Professionals with accurate information so Community Management Professionals can service your account properly.
  • Review statements monthly and notify Community Management Professionals of any discrepancies found as soon as possible.
  • Maintain a current insurance policy for the property.
  • Review property insurance yearly and update as needed.
  • Treat Community Management Professionals personnel with courtesy. Please notify the management if there are problems with Community Management Professionals personnel so that any issues can be dealt with quickly and responsibly.

Please also note the Life Expectancy of the Appliances in your Rental Homes:
Appliance Life Expectancy (From Mr. Applicance Expert Appliance Repair - http://www.mrappliance.com/expert/life-guide/)

Do you know how long your freezer will last? How many years should you expect your washer and dryer to function properly? To effectively manage your household budget, it helps to know the life expectancy of your appliances. This can help you determine if an appliance can be saved or if its time might be up. The best way to ensure your appliances have a long, healthy life is to perform regular maintenance and have them checked periodically by an appliance repair expert.

Major Home Appliances (Excludes Commercial Appliances)

Life Expectancy (Years)
 
  Low High Average
Trash Compactors

7

12

11

Dryers, electric

11

18

14

Dryers, gas

11

16

13

Dishwashers

9

16

12

Garbage Disposals

10

15

13

Freezers

12

20

16

Microwaves

5

10

8

Ranges, electric

13

20

16

Ranges, gas

15

23

19

Ranges, hoods

9

19

14

Refrigerators, compact

4

12

8

Refrigerators, standard

10

18

14

Washers

8

16

12

 
WHAT IS ORDINARY WEAR AND TEAR?

Typical definition of ordinary wear and tear is "That deterioration which occurs based upon the use of which the rental unit is intended and without negligence, carelessness, accident, or misuse, or abuse of the premises or contents by the tenant or members of his household, or their invitees or guests." 

In other words, ordinary wear and tear is the natural and gradual deterioration of the apartment over time, which results from a tenant's normal use of the apartment. For example, the carpeting in an apartment, or even the paint on the walls, wears out in the normal course of living. Carpets become threadbare, and paint peels and cracks. Even the most responsible tenant can't prevent the aging process, and a court won't make the tenant pay for damages resulting from that process. 

Also, a court won't hold a tenant responsible for damage arising from using the apartment in a normal way. For instance, an Illinois owner held back part of a security deposit to pay for repair of nail holes left behind by a tenant who had hung some pictures. The tenant sued to get back his full security deposit. The Illinois court said the nail holes were the result of ordinary wear and tear. After all, hanging pictures is a normal incident of apartment living; it can reasonably be expected. 

WHAT'S NOT ORDINARY WEAR AND TEAR?

A landlord can make a tenant pay for damages if the tenant helped the aging process along or didn't use the apartment in a normal way. A carpet worn from people walking on it is something you have to expect. But a tenant who cuts a hole in the carpet or spills paint on it may be held responsible for the damage. 

How can you tell what is and isn't ordinary wear and tear? There are three basic types of damages caused by a tenant that aren't considered ordinary wear and tear. They are: 

1. Negligence. If a tenant does something carelessly that the tenant should have known would cause damage, or if the tenant failed to do something that the tenant reasonably should have done to prevent damage, that's negligence. In short, did the tenant act prudently to preserve the property? 

- Failure to warn. Another form of negligence is where the tenant fails to take steps that could prevent damage to the apartment. Even the reasonable wear and tear exception shouldn't insulate a tenant from responsibility if the tenant fails to let the management know when something goes wrong in the apartment that might later result in worse damage. 

For example, if a window pane is cracked because of a faulty foundation, that's not the tenant's fault. But if the tenant doesn't tell the management that the crack is letting in water and the carpet below the window gets water damaged, the management may be able to argue that this extra damage was caused by the tenant's failure to inform the management of the problem. 

2. Abuse/misuse. If the tenant knowingly or deliberately mistreats the property, or uses is for the wrong purposes, the damage the tenant causes isn't ordinary war and tear - it's abuse or misuse. 

For example, did the tenant slide furniture over an unprotected floor, causing gouges? Or did the tenant discolor the bathtub by using it to dye fabrics? Was the tenant an artist who failed to cover the floor as the tenant painted, leaving permanent stains on the carpet? Did the tenant paint the walls of the apartment black? 

One court decision court said a tenant had to pay for leaving an apartment carpet mutilated in an area around a wet bar, damaged by rust and mildew stains from plant containers, and covered with cigarette burns - some clear through the pad. 

3. Accident. Sometimes damage occurs by mistake. The tenant party guest drops a drink on the new carpet, staining it. The tenant drops a heavy planter and crack the tile floor. Or the tenant's cleaning the light and the fixture falls and breaks.. Or the tenant accidentally leaves the bathtub faucet on, flooding part of the apartment and staining wood floors and carpeting. Even though the tenant didn't purposely damage your property, the management will be able to withhold the cost of repair from the security deposit. 

OTHER FACTORS

In evaluating whether apartment damage exceeds ordinary wear and tear, there are some other factors to keep in mind. They include: 

Extent of damage. The exact type of damage may be as important as the extent of the damage when evaluating whether it's ordinary wear and tear or not. For example, two or three nail holes in a wall may be considered ordinary wear and tear. But dozens of nail holes may be considered abuse. A few scratches on a wood floor are unavoidable. But a missing wood plank is negligence or abuse. 

Length of residence. Certain things wear out over time. But over how long? The ordinary wear and tear on an apartment from a tenant who's lived there only a short time should be considerably less than that of a tenant who's lived there for a long time. Say you installed new carpet before renting an apartment. It may be reasonable to expect that if a tenant lives there 10 years before moving out, everyday usage would leave it somewhat damaged. But if a tenant moves out after only three months and the carpet is ripped and stained, that's unreasonable, and the management can probably charge the tenant for the damage. 

Character and construction of building. An older building may be expected to undergo greater and more rapid deterioration than a newer building. For example, wooden windowsills in an older building may dry out, rot, or crack over time through no fault of the tenant. But if the building is new, it unlikely that the windowsills would crack with-out some carelessness on the tenant's part (e.g., standing on the windowsill to put up drapes). 

EXAMPLES OF WEAR AND TEAR VS. DAMAGES
WEAR & TEAR  DAMAGES
-Peeling or cracked paint -Drawings on the walls(e.g., murals)
-Worn enamel in old bathtub -Chipped and broken enamel in bathtub
-Worn or cracked linoleum in place where appliances had been -Broken window caused by resident slamming window shut
-Cracked window pane due to faulty foundation and settling of building -Holes in carpet from cigarette burns or carpet damaged by rust and mildew stains from tenant's plant containers
-Carpet worn thin by people walking on it -Large chunk of plaster ripped out of wall
-Door that sticks in humidity -Painted-over kitchen or bathroom tile
-Small piece of wall plaster chipped -Missing fixtures; hole in ceiling where fixture had been removed
-Faded tile -Toilet backed up because tenant flushed cardboard down it
-Faded lampshade -Floors gouged when moving furniture
-Fire damage due to faulty wiring -Wallpaper missing where tenant tore it off wall
-Sink drainage slow because of old pipe system -Sliding closet doors off track because track bent
-Floors need new coat of varnish -Walls burned in kitchen from burner turned too high when pot on stove
-Corner of piece of wallpaper coming lose because the glue has aged -Shower rod missing
-Sliding closet doors stick -Tiles missing or cracked
-Paint faded on kitchen walls -Torn window shade
-Shower rod somewhat rusted
-Grouting in bathroom tile loose

-Dirty or faded window



 

 

   

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